11th Sunday after Trinity

Watchword from the 1st letter of the apostle St. Peter: “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.” (1Pe 5:5)

The Introit is from Psalm 113:   Praise ye the LORD. Praise, O ye servants of the LORD, praise the name of the LORD.  Blessed be the name of the LORD from this time forth and for evermore. From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same the LORD’S name is to be praised. The LORD is high above all nations, and his glory above the heavens. Who is like unto the LORD our God, who dwelleth on high, Who humbleth himself to behold the things that are in heaven, and in the earth! He raiseth up the poor out of the dust, and lifteth the needy out of the dunghill; That he may set him with princes, even with the princes of his people. He maketh the barren woman to keep house, and to be a joyful mother of children. Praise ye the LORD. (Psa 113:1-9 KJV) Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit as it was in the beginning, is now and will be forever. Amen.

God’s Holy Word from the Old Testament in the 2nd book of Samuel the twelfth chapter: The LORD sent Nathan to David. When he came to him, he said, “There were two men in a certain town, one rich and the other poor.  The rich man had a very large number of sheep and cattle,  but the poor man had nothing except one little ewe lamb he had bought. He raised it, and it grew up with him and his children. It shared his food, drank from his cup and even slept in his arms. It was like a daughter to him. “Now a traveler came to the rich man, but the rich man refrained from taking one of his own sheep or cattle to prepare a meal for the traveler who had come to him. Instead, he took the ewe lamb that belonged to the poor man and prepared it for the one who had come to him.” David burned with anger against the man and said to Nathan, “As surely as the LORD lives, the man who did this deserves to die!  He must pay for that lamb four times over, because he did such a thing and had no pity.”  Then Nathan said to David, “You are the man! This is what the LORD, the God of Israel, says: ‘I anointed you king over Israel, and I delivered you from the hand of Saul.  I gave your master’s house to you, and your master’s wives into your arms. I gave you the house of Israel and Judah. And if all this had been too little, I would have given you even more.  Why did you despise the word of the LORD by doing what is evil in his eyes? You struck down Uriah the Hittite with the sword and took his wife to be your own. You killed him with the sword of the Ammonites.  Now, therefore, the sword will never depart from your house, because you despised me and took the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your own.’…Then David said to Nathan, “I have sinned against the LORD.” Nathan replied, “The LORD has taken away your sin. You are not going to die.  But because by doing this you have made the enemies of the LORD show utter contempt, the son born to you will die.”  After Nathan had gone home, the LORD struck the child that Uriah’s wife had borne to David… (2 Samuel 12:1-10. 13-15)

God’s Holy Word in the Epistle to the Ephesians in the second chapter:  But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy,  made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions– it is by grace you have been saved.  And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus, in order that in the coming ages he might show the incomparable riches of his grace, expressed in his kindness to us in Christ Jesus. For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith– and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God–  not by works, so that no one can boast.  For we are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do. (Ephesians 2:4-10)

The Holy Gospel by the holy evangelist St. Luke in the eighteenth chapter: To some who were confident of their own righteousness and looked down on everybody else, Jesus told this parable:  “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood up and prayed about himself: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other men– robbers, evildoers, adulterers– or even like this tax collector.  I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I get.’ “But the tax collector stood at a distance. He would not even look up to heaven, but beat his breast and said, ‘God, have mercy on me, a sinner.’ “I tell you that this man, rather than the other, went home justified before God. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.”  (Luke 18:9-14)

The Sermon text is from the evangelist and apostle St. Matthew the twenty-first chapter: “What do you think? A man had two sons. And he went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work in the vineyard today. And he answered, ‘I will not,’ but afterward he changed his mind and went.  And he went to the other son and said the same. And he answered, ‘I go, sir,’ but did not go. Which of the two did the will of his father?” They said, “The first.” Jesus said to them, “Truly, I say to you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes go into the kingdom of God before you.  For John came to you in the way of righteousness, and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him. And even when you saw it, you did not afterward change your minds and believe him. (Mat 21:28-32 ESV)

The liturgical colour is green.

Together with the Christian Church we pray a collect for the 11th Sunday after Trinity: Almighty and everlasting God, always more ready to hear than we to pray and to give more than we either desire or deserve, pour down upon us the abundance of Your mercy, forgiving those things of which our conscience is afraid and giving us those good things that we are not worthy to ask, except through the merits and mediation of Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. (Collect for the 11th Sunday after Trinity in LSB Pastoral Companion Pg. 596)

Hymn for the week: “From Depths of Woe I Cry to Thee” by Martin Luther, 1483-1546

  1. From depths of woe I cry to Thee,
    Lord, hear me, I implore Thee.
    Bend down Thy gracious ear to me,
    My prayer let come before Thee.
    If Thou rememberest each misdeed,
    If each should have its rightful meed,
    Who may abide Thy presence?
  2. Thy love and grace alone avail
    To blot out my transgression;
    The best and holiest deeds must fail
    To break sin’s dread oppression.
    Before Thee none can boasting stand,
    But all must fear Thy strict demand
    And live alone by mercy.
  3. Therefore my hope is in the Lord
    And not in mine own merit;
    It rests upon His faithful Word
    To them of contrite spirit
    That He is merciful and just;
    This is my comfort and my trust.
    His help I wait with patience.
  4. And though it tarry till the night
    And till the morning waken,
    My heart shall never doubt His might
    Nor count itself forsaken.
    Do thus, O ye of Israel’s seed,
    Ye of the Spirit born indeed;
    Wait for your God’s appearing.
  5.  Though great our sins and sore our woes,
    His grace much more aboundeth;
    His helping love no limit knows,
    Our utmost need it soundeth.
    Our shepherd good and true is He,
    Who will at last His Israel free
    From all their sin and sorrow.

Hymn 329 from The Lutheran Hymnal Text: Ps. 130 Author: Martin Luther Translated by: Catherine Winkworth, 1863, alt. Titled: “Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir”  1st Published in: Johann Walther’s Gesangbüchlein Town: Wittenberg, 1524

If you are called to preach this weekend, may the triune God give you joy and strength, wisdom, knowledge and insight – and the true words and pictures to preach his holy will faithfully according to his most precious revelation of his will and promises in both the Old and New Testament! However if you are not preaching, but listening – then listen as if God is talking to you + His precious gospel is “the power of God for the salvation of everyone who believes.” (Rom 1:16 NIV)

About Wilhelm Weber jr

Rector of the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Tshwane
This entry was posted in Trinity (The church season after Pentecost), Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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